Bass Neck Fret Sizes

Choosing a Fretwire

Warmoth offers a wide range of materials and fret sizes. Choosing a fret size is easy. Do you like the feel of the frets on your present neck? Would you like more height or less height? Do you press down firmly or lightly on your strings? We've listed some additional information below to help you with your selection.


Player Tips:
  • Are you tough on your frets? Consider stainless steel.
  • Concerned about tonal changes? We have not found a significant difference in tonality between stainless steel and nickel/silver fretwire.
  • Fret size has a great deal to do with the action of your guitar. Low frets put your fingertips right on the fingerboard with little room to squeeze the strings out of tune or to get under them for bending. Tall frets are the opposite. The width of the fret determines the amount of wear that can be expected before leveling and re-crowning is necessary. Wider frets wear longer. Narrow frets wear faster.


Tech Tips:
  • Stainless steel wire and our gold fretwire are more difficult to install. Please add $20.00 to the basic neck cost for stainless steel wire installation and $30.00 for our gold fretwire installation.
  • While stainless steel and gold fretwire are harder material than nickel/silver, the same fret leveling/dress techniques can still be used. It may take longer to dress, but these harder frets will last much longer than comparable sized nickel/silver frets.


Standard Nickel/Silver Fret Wire

We offer only quality fret wire drawn from the finest 18% hard nickel/silver to give long life with steel strings. The composition of this fret wire, while called "nickel/silver," contains no silver at all. The ingredients are brass and nickel. For general reference, we use Dunlop's fret numbers, however, actual fret dimensions vary somewhat from batch to batch. Our nickel/silver fretwire is rated at HV 170 on the Vickers hardness scale.



Item Number Width X Height Description Used By
6230 .080" X .037" This is the smallest fret wire Vintage Fender necks
6130 .106" X .036" Often referred to as "Medium Jumbo" Many Gibson necks
6105 .095" X .045" Narrow and tall Most popular choice
6150 .103" X .046" The standard "Jumbo," it is about the same width as the 6130 but a bit taller Modern Fender American necks
6100 .118" X .058" Huge! This is big stuff for an almost scalloped feel Common on Ibanez necks


Stainless Steel Fret Wire

Stainless steel is both harder (Vickers hardness HV 300 +/-20) and smoother than nickel/silver fretwire. For general reference, we use Dunlop's fret numbers, however, actual fret dimensions vary somewhat from batch to batch.



Item Number Width X Height Description Used By
SS6230 .080" X .043" Small vintage Fender Size Vintage Fender necks
SS6105 .095" X .047" Narrow and tall Most popular choice
SS6150 .104" X .047" The standard "jumbo" size Modern Fender American necks
SS6115 .108" x .051" A true "jumbo" wire
SS6100 .110" X .057" Huge! This is big stuff for an almost scalloped feel


Gold Color Fret Wire

Our beautiful gold fret wire is a nickel-free copper alloy similar in color to 12k gold! This is not the same brass color as the Warwick wire. Our gold fret is solid throughout and is almost as hard as stainless steel. It polishes up nicely for a super fast, glass-like feel providing effort free string bending! Vickers hardness rating is HV 250 +/-20.

NOTE: Our gold fret wire is hypo-allergenic for those that have allergies to nickel.



Item Number Width X Height Description Used By
GD6150 .104" X .047" A true standard "Jumbo" size
GD6100 .110" X .057" Huge! Wide and tall